Posts filed under ‘Industrial Hemp Farming’

NAT, Tuscarora Team To Develop CRAiLAR® Flax Blends For New Application

Naturally Advanced Technologies Inc. (NAT), Vancouver, Canada, has granted a non-exclusive, non-transferable license to Mt. Pleasant, N.C.-based Tuscarora Yarns Inc., under which Tuscarora will design and manufacture specialty yarns containing blends of NAT’s CRAiLAR® Flax fiber with cotton or other fibers. The yarns are being developed for sale and distribution to third-party Crailar licensees. NAT expects the partnership will open avenues for the fiber’s use in heretofore-unexplored apparel and home furnishings sectors.

“Tuscarora is one of the most innovative yarn spinners in the world, and has the ability to prepare us for entry into several unexplored categories such as couture fashion, sports performance, extreme weather gear, and certain sectors of home furnishings,” said NAT CEO Ken Barker. “This agreement will seek to push the applications of CRAiLAR beyond our first phase of cotton blending and establish new market sectors for this unique and sustainable natural fiber.”

Crailar technology comprises an enzymatic process that converts bast fibers such as hemp, flax, jute and kenaf into materials that are as soft as cotton but more durable and eco-friendly, according to NAT. These bast fibers can be blended with cotton and other fibers; and can be processed using existing spinning, weaving, knitting or other fabric-forming processes. Applications range from various apparel and home textiles products to industrial textiles.  To read the full story please click here.

01/02/2012 at 3:16 pm Leave a comment

For 2012, Organic Cotton Market Is Forecasted to Grow 20%

Textile Exchange, the global organization dedicated to promoting the use of organic cotton, just released its annual Global Sustainable Textile Market Report. According to the Report, organic cotton represented a $6.2 billion industry last year and stands to grow another 20 percent in 2012, ballooning to $7.4 billion.

Along with that forecast, the Report also published its list of the top 10 corporations using organic cotton. Just a quick glance reveals that the list is filled with industry-leading apparel companies who wield strong taste-making influence, from athletic brands like Nike and adidas to big box retailer Target or mall fashion brand Zara.

At the top of the list is Sweden’s H & M, which used more than 15,000 tons of organic cotton in 2010. According to CSR Product Manager Henrik Lampa, by creating demand for organic cotton, H & M is incentivizing cotton farmers to adopt sustainable cultivation practices.

Of course, there are many experts who think that cotton, as a crop, is too difficult to sustainably grow. Given that opinion, we won’t be surprised when next year’s edition of the Report begins to track the rise of organic cotton alternatives, such as flax and hemp.

07/10/2011 at 11:52 am Leave a comment

NAT CEO Ken Barker Profiled in Financial Post

Photography by Darryl James / Financial Post Magazine

We’re very excited to share a recent profile of NAT CEO Ken Barker in Toronto’s Financial Post. In the story, reporter John Shmuel discusses the way Ken’s vision of how an organic cotton alternative could penetrate more industries than apparel has helped NAT land some significant partnerships with global brands such as HanesBrands and Levi Strauss & Co.  “There isn’t a category or industry we’re not engaged in,” Ken is quoted as saying in the article. “We have the first viable alternative to cotton, and we’re making sure everyone knows that.” Read the entire profile, including Ken’s tips for successful partnerships, read the full story here.

03/10/2011 at 12:10 pm Leave a comment

The Right Message with the Wrong Tactics

Hemp Farming

A group of hemp farmers and business leaders were arrested earlier last week for digging up the DEA headquarters lawn to plant industrial hemp seeds.

Among those arrested were Will Allen, a 70 year old organic sunflower and canola farmer from Vermont, Wayne Hauge, a 51 year old grandfather that grows garbonzo beans in North Dakota, Isaac Nicholson, owner of sustainable lifestyle clothing line Livity and David Bronner, president of US based multi million dollar soap company Dr. Bronners Soaps.  For years now, both Nicholson and Bronner have been forced to buy hemp cross borders due to the DEA’s restrictions on industrial hemp.

Although we agree with the message and can completely understand their frustration, we have to disagree with the tactics used.  Acts such as these encourage stereotypes of hemp activists and dilute the real story of a crop that has such great potential.

We’ve believe that it’s important to influence law makers by initiating and proving out the market potential for industrial hemp products.  We are showing through our relationships with some of the worlds leading consumer brands, such as Hanes and Georgia Pacific, that there is a consumer pull for the product on a massive scale.  We believe this pull will demonstrate hemp’s viability and will influence lawmakers and farmers to re-legalize and grow hemp.

Currently nine states – Hawaii, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, Vermont and West Virginia – allow industrial hemp production but federal law, which requires nearly “impossible to obtain” permits in order to grow hemp, trumps state laws.

23/10/2009 at 9:30 am Leave a comment

Huffington Post Article

Huffington Post

Industrial Hemp

“Legalize It and I Will Industrialize It:  Industrial Hemp Is the Engine to Kickstart This Economy”

A big thank you to Anna Brones, from The Huffington Post, for featuring NAT in this great article!

Click here to read it!

22/10/2009 at 8:23 am Leave a comment


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