Posts tagged ‘sustainability’

NAT Label Victory

Naturally Advanced Technologies Inc. announced Monday that the Federal Trade Commission will allow the company to label products made with its fiber as “flax” rather than “linen.”

The distinction is important for the company, which keeps its executive offices in Portland, as it pursues a retail strategy with partners including HanesBrands, Target and Levi Strauss & Co., some of the brands that are evaluating or using Naturally Advanced’s flax-based Crailar fiber.  To read the full story click here.

10/07/2012 at 1:34 pm Leave a comment

Target Hits a Bullseye Introducing Sustainability to a Mass Market

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Target is on the forefront of marketing when it comes to sustainability. With green commercial production and their ban on sand blasted jeans, Target is evolving the way they communicate with their consumers.

Focusing on social responsibility Target features brands like Method, Burt’s Bees and Yes To on their blog. These brands emphasize their actions; what they do rather than what they do not. Words like “anti” are left out and a more positive focus on the benefits of their products are highlighted.

Companies that feel the pressure of wanting to sell socially responsible products but worry about their sales falling short could take a cue from Target, who have hit the mark. To read the full story please click here.

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03/05/2012 at 12:29 pm 1 comment

Shaping Sustainable Fashion

The production, use and eventual disposal of most clothing is environmentally damaging, and many fashion and textile designers are becoming keen to employ more sustainable strategies in their work.  Shaping Sustainable Fashion provides a practical guide to the ways in which designers are creating fashion with less waste and greater durability.

Based on the results of extensive research into lifecycle approaches to sustainable fashion, the book is divided into four sections:

  • Source explores the motivations for the selection of materials for fashion garments and suggests that garments can be made from materials that also assist in the management of textile waste.
  • Make discusses the differing approaches to the design and manufacture of sustainable fashion garments that can also provide the opportunity for waste control and minimization.
  • Use explores schemes that encourage the consumer to engage in slow fashion consumption.
  • Last examines alternative solutions to the predictable fate of most garments – landfill.

Illustrated throughout with case studies of best practice from international designers and fashion labels and written in a practical, accessible style, this is a must-have guide for fashion and textile designers and students in their areas.

23/06/2011 at 8:56 am 1 comment

Force of Nature: The Unlikely Story of Wal-Mart’s Green Revolution

Wal-Mart—the world’s largest, arguably most powerful corporation—has long been plagued by terrible PR and a never-ending slew of lawsuits.  Enter Jib Ellison, river guide turned corporate consultant, determined to convince executives that making a profit and building a sustainable business are not mutually exclusive and would, in fact, confer a powerful competitive advantage.

Ellison has instituted a project at Wal-Mart called “The Index” that challenges suppliers to root out inefficiency and waste.  Packaging has shrunk, saving millions of gallons of water, millions of pounds of cardboard, not to mention diesel fuel.  Wal-Mart’s sheer size, coupled with its lowest-pricing mission, means that producers are forced to take steps toward sustainability—and make natural, organic, and earth-friendly products widely available.

Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Humes offers a stirring story of how ecologically responsible practices are increasingly benefiting the bottom line, and how as Wal-Mart goes global , the biggest retailer in the world is, slowly but surely, encouraging a change for the better.  A fascinating, fair-minded look at the congruence between environmentalism and business, and the behemoth at the intersection.

 

 

09/06/2011 at 6:27 am Leave a comment

A Billion Acts of Green

In celebration of Earth Day, we’d like to encourage you to join the the world’s biggest online climate action movement!  A Billion Acts of Green allows you to show your commitment to the earth by pledging an “Act of Green”.  It can be as simple as setting up a compost in your home, riding your bike to work daily to offsetting your flights.

What are you waiting for…..sign up today to make your commitment in making our world a better place to live!

21/04/2011 at 8:04 am Leave a comment

Building a Business With a Social Mission

Eric Ryan, co-founder of method – a company providing green home and personal care cleaning products – believes that meaning in work is central to a strong corporate culture.

“Having a purpose larger than profits has been key to our success. By contrast, most corporate values are just that – the values of the corporation.  No matter how much ambition, camaraderie, and loyalty an employee brings to work, no one is taking those corporate values home to share with friends and family.  But those same values become immeasurably more meaningful when they’re tied to a higher purpose.”

He recently shared his thoughts and practices on building a business with a social mission with Fast Company.  To hear what he has to say and to be inspired, click here.

05/04/2011 at 5:00 am Leave a comment

Nike Paves the Way

In an effort to further industry sustainability efforts, NIKE Inc.released its Environmental Apparel Design Tool, based on Nike’s Considered Design Index.  The release of the tool aims to accelerate collaboration between companies, fast-track sustainable innovation and decrease the use of natural resources such as oil and water.

Designed and built by Nike over seven years, with a six million dollar investment, the software-based Environmental Apparel Design Tool helps designers to make real time choices that decrease the environmental impacts of their work.

Recognizing the decline of natural resources and the need to move to a low-carbon economy, the tool is a practical way to rate how apparel designs score in reducing waste and increasing the use of environmentally preferred materials while allowing the designers to make real time adjustments.

Nike is committed to open innovation and welcomes others building and improving on this tool.

“This tool is about making it simple for designers to make the most sustainable choices right at the start of the product creation process.  Over the past four years it has proved to be invaluable at Nike and has helped us create products with a higher sustainability standard,” said Hannah Jones, Vice President of Nike Sustainable Business and Innovation.

“By releasing the tool we want others to improve on it and we hope to inspire further collaboration to create global industry standards for a level playing field, encourage widespread industry adoption of sustainable design practices and have more sustainable products available for the consumer.”

In the last year alone, Nike doubled its use of recycled polyester,  saving 82 million plastic bottles from landfill.  If all apparel companies committed to converting one third of their polyester garments to recycled polyester, the demand for recycled polyester would be greater than the annual production of plastic bottles, diverting PET bottles from landfill.

“Nike’s decision to open-source this design tool is a win-win because it leverages important intellectual capital to benefit an entire industry,” said Mindy Lubber, president of Ceres, a leading coalition of investors and environmental groups that works with companies like Nike to address sustainability challenges.  “Whether for sneakers or cars, it is hugely important to integrate water, chemical, energy and waste considerations into all product design.  If all apparel companies use this tool, the impacts could be breathtaking, from less-clogged landfills to expanding our sustainable material industries.”

Mike Barry, Head of Sustainability for Marks & Spencer, who has worked closely with Nike for several years on sustainability issues, said:  “As a company committed to developing a sustainable business, we welcome this type of industry collaboration.  The Nike tool will help apparel companies and retailers design more sustainable product.  We firmly believe that sharing knowledge like this helps us all move towards a more sustainable future faster.”

These efforts come after Nike’s announcement earlier this year about the GreenXchange (GX), a Web-based marketplace where companies can collaborate and share intellectual property which can lead to new sustainability business models and innovation.  Nike committed to placing more than 400 patents on GX for research, demonstrating its belief that the best way to stimulate sustainable innovation is through open innovation.

07/12/2010 at 6:00 am Leave a comment

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