Posts tagged ‘Target’

NAT Label Victory

Naturally Advanced Technologies Inc. announced Monday that the Federal Trade Commission will allow the company to label products made with its fiber as “flax” rather than “linen.”

The distinction is important for the company, which keeps its executive offices in Portland, as it pursues a retail strategy with partners including HanesBrands, Target and Levi Strauss & Co., some of the brands that are evaluating or using Naturally Advanced’s flax-based Crailar fiber.  To read the full story click here.

10/07/2012 at 1:34 pm Leave a comment

Target Hits a Bullseye Introducing Sustainability to a Mass Market

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Target is on the forefront of marketing when it comes to sustainability. With green commercial production and their ban on sand blasted jeans, Target is evolving the way they communicate with their consumers.

Focusing on social responsibility Target features brands like Method, Burt’s Bees and Yes To on their blog. These brands emphasize their actions; what they do rather than what they do not. Words like “anti” are left out and a more positive focus on the benefits of their products are highlighted.

Companies that feel the pressure of wanting to sell socially responsible products but worry about their sales falling short could take a cue from Target, who have hit the mark. To read the full story please click here.

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03/05/2012 at 12:29 pm 1 comment

The Oregonian; NAT officials say their fiber could change apparel production

Ken Barker hands over a piece of cardboard with fabric swatches attached.

Barker is delivering his feel test, challenging his subject to detect the difference between cotton-only pieces and those with a combination of cotton and “Crailar,” a fiber derived from flax stalks.

Barker, chief executive of Naturally Advanced Technologies Inc., the makers of Crailar, has touted the fiber’s benefits to provide protection against volatile cotton prices. Crailer also has a much smaller ecological footprint than cotton’s, his company’s research shows.

And Oregon — from the company’s Lake Oswego-based managers to Willamette Valley farmers — are expected to play a key role in growing Crailar from seedling concept to harvested game-changer.

Barker has convinced the likes of Target Corp., Levi Strauss & Co., HanesBrands and Carhartt that Crailar could make a difference in production of fabrics and apparel.

Crailar has partnered with those companies and others to produce or test Crailar for a variety of products. Naturally Advanced announced Thursday that Target has entered a development and supply agreement to evaluate Crailar in the retailer’s domestic textiles category such as table linens, window treatments and towels.  To read the full story click here.

02/12/2011 at 10:48 am Leave a comment

Target & NAT Sign Two Year Agreement

This morning, Naturally Advanced Technologies announced it has signed an exclusive deal with national retail giant Target.  Target and its vendors will be working with CRAiLAR Flax fiber to evaluate its uses in a number of domestic textile categories including sheets, top of bed, shower curtains, window treatments, table linens, decorative pillows, towels and more.

Ken Barker, CEO of Naturally Advanced Technologies, commented on the partnership agreement, which begins December 1, 2011, “Target represents a best-in-class partner for CRAiLAR in the domestic textiles category. Also the fiber’s performance in moisture management, shrinkage reduction, and dye chemical savings is in line with Target’s sustainability efforts.”

Target’s commitment to environmental sustainability is a focused effort in its Here for Good campaign.  With an entire website dedicated to the far reaching initiative, Target focuses on improving communities, health, education and the environment.

01/12/2011 at 11:55 am 1 comment

For 2012, Organic Cotton Market Is Forecasted to Grow 20%

Textile Exchange, the global organization dedicated to promoting the use of organic cotton, just released its annual Global Sustainable Textile Market Report. According to the Report, organic cotton represented a $6.2 billion industry last year and stands to grow another 20 percent in 2012, ballooning to $7.4 billion.

Along with that forecast, the Report also published its list of the top 10 corporations using organic cotton. Just a quick glance reveals that the list is filled with industry-leading apparel companies who wield strong taste-making influence, from athletic brands like Nike and adidas to big box retailer Target or mall fashion brand Zara.

At the top of the list is Sweden’s H & M, which used more than 15,000 tons of organic cotton in 2010. According to CSR Product Manager Henrik Lampa, by creating demand for organic cotton, H & M is incentivizing cotton farmers to adopt sustainable cultivation practices.

Of course, there are many experts who think that cotton, as a crop, is too difficult to sustainably grow. Given that opinion, we won’t be surprised when next year’s edition of the Report begins to track the rise of organic cotton alternatives, such as flax and hemp.

07/10/2011 at 11:52 am Leave a comment


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